The University of Alabama

UA in the News: Nov. 15, 2013

University of Alabama sorority elects its first African American president
Fox 6 (Birmingham) – Nov. 14
For the first time ever, a majority white University of Alabama sorority has just elected its first African American president. Hannah Patterson has been a memberof Sigma Delta Tau for a year and her sisters elected her president last week. Patterson says she ran for president to help her sorority grow. The 22-year-old engineering student went through formal sorority recruitment but didn’t find one that fit. She doesn’t believe her race played a role. But Patterson bonded with the sisters of Sigma Delta Tau, a historically Jewish sorority, during a period of informal recruiting. She’s one of three black members in the chapter and says her race had nothing to do with her election. “It just did it because I wanted to help my sorority. The girls voted for me because they saw my leadership skills and everything. I guess that was kind of a coincidence. But I didn’t think they looked at my race,” Patterson said. Her sisters say she’s a proven leader. “She was just the best for us. She is so pro-active in our sorority,” Kristen Feyt said.
Fox 6 (Birmingham) – Nov. 14
ABC 33/40 (Birmingham) – Nov. 14
WSFA-NBC (Montgomery) – Nov. 14

Black Warrior River eroding shoreline at Moundville, endangering future archaeological finds
Tuscaloosa News – Nov. 14
The Black Warrior River once fueled the lives of the indigenous people of Moundville, but now the river is eroding the shoreline, threatening archaeological efforts to preserve the past. Moundville, an archaeological park and museum in Hale County administered by the University of Alabama, was home to Native Americans of the Mississippian Era, between the 11th and 16th centuries. Their presence was marked by a series of 26 mounds. Researchers with the university and the Army Corps of Engineers are trying to restore and protect the site from the damage of the Black Warrior River…Bill Bomar, the interim executive director of the University of Alabama Museums, helps oversee the excavation of the site as well as the protection of it. “My biggest concern is that erosion of the river bluff at Moundville has increased very rapidly in the last five years,” Bomar said. “The Moundville site is only 10 percent excavated, making it one of the best-preserved sites of its kind in the world. We take the preservation of the site very seriously because once the ground is disturbed and archaeological deposits are removed, the soil stains, food remains, hearths, house posts, human remains and artifacts can never be put back. Only careful excavation and documentation can allow all of the pieces of the puzzle to be connected through analysis.”

University of Alabama to hold annual children’s book sale
Tuscaloosa News – Nov. 15
The University of Alabama’s School of Library and Information Studies will hold its annual children’s and young adult book sale in December. The book sale will be from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Dec. 4 and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Dec. 5-6. The sale will be held on the fifth floor of the Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library in the School of Library and Information Studies’ study area. Specialty and toy books will cost $5 each, hardcover books will be $4, and board books and paperbacks will be $2. A limited number of free books will also be available. Cash, checks and purchase orders will be accepted. Proceeds from the sale support the National Latino Children’s Literature Conference, housed in the School of Library and Information Studies. The event is open to the public.

UA student and current Miss Philippines talks about helping the Philippines after the typhoon
Fox 6 (Birmingham) – Nov. 14
It’s been a week since the super typhoon hit the Philippine islands and the tragic disaster has hit home for beauty queen at the University of Alabama. Miss Philippines USA is a student at the University of Alabama. Joining us live this morning from our Tuscaloosa newsroom is Jasmine Sabio, a pre-med major and the reigning Miss Philippines USA.

University of Alabama student battles rare disorder
Tuscaloosa News – Nov. 15
Dillon Anderson, a 19-year-old former Tuscaloosa Academy football player, recently had his freshman year at the University of Alabama cut short when doctors determined it was time for a bone marrow transplant to treat a rare immune deficiency disorder. “Three years ago, when he was diagnosed, is when they told us that it was the only cure for the disease but, at that time, he wasn’t staying as sick as he is now,” said Michael Anderson, Dillon’s father. In the past year, Michael Anderson estimated that his son has had pneumonia six times…His cousin, Julie Cook, began the “Team Dillon” Facebook page and is helping to coordinate fundraisers to help offset the family’s medical expenses. T-shirts for $18 and crosses for $20 are being sold through the Facebook page.Planned fundraisers include a blood drive and raffle at Rehab at Work on Nov. 22 and a spaghetti dinner at Eaglewood Baptist Church on Dec. 7 for $10 a plate.

Wine tasting to benefit Secret Meals program
Tuscaloosa News – Nov. 14
University of Alabama advertising and public relations students will host a fundraiser for Secret Meals for Hungry Children from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday at Carpe Vino, 515 Greensboro Ave. Two wine tasting options will be available during the fundraiser. The first is a regular tasting that costs $15 per person. The second is a premium tasting that will allow guests the opportunity to taste the best wines Carpe Vino offers without having to purchase the entire bottle. The premium tasting will cost $25. Organizers will donate $10 of each regular wine tasting ticket to Secret Meals for Hungry Children and $15 of each premium tasting ticket. Secret Meals for Hungry Children is a partnership between Alabama Credit Union, regional food banks and volunteers to discreetly provide weekend meals for needy children.

Showtime Sports Premieres AGAINST THE TIDE Tonight
Broadway World – Nov. 15
Did University of Alabama coach Paul “Bear” Bryant and University of Southern California coach John McKay purposefully schedule the first game of the 1970 season – the first time a fully integrated team had played in Alabama – as a statement against segregation? Or was it simply another game between two College Football powerhouses whose coaches were close personal friends? What were Bryant’s and McKay’s motives for the last-minute addition of USC, a fully integrated team ranked by some as the No. 1 team in the country, to the 1970 Alabama schedule? Showtime Sports examines these questions in the film “AGAINST THE TIDE,” a feature-length documentary from EMMY Award winning producer Ross Greenburg; premiering tonight, Nov. 15 at 10 p.m. ET/PT on SHOWTIME.

The University of Alabama, a student-centered research university, is experiencing significant growth in both enrollment and academic quality. This growth, which is positively impacting the campus and the state's economy, is in keeping with UA's vision to be the university of choice for the best and brightest students. UA, the state's flagship university, is an academic community united in its commitment to enhancing the quality of life for all Alabamians.