The University of Alabama

UA in the News: December 8-10, 2012

University of Alabama program prepares rural students for med school
Tuscaloosa News – Dec. 9
A family doctor in a rural town wears multiple hats, from teacher and counselor to knowledge base and expert adviser…“Urban students develop a different set of values and expectations about what they believe to be the good things in life, and once they complete their medical training, the things they seek are not to be found in rural areas,” said Dr. John Wheat, professor of community and rural medicine at the University of Alabama’s College of Community Health Sciences. “To produce a predictable supply of rural physicians, one would be best to grow your own out of rural communities.” For more than 20 years, UA has done just that through development of the UA Rural Health Leaders Pipeline, a series of programs that help rural students prepare for medical and health careers…Students who go through the Rural Health Pipeline focus on rural health care, not just through textbooks, but through face-to-face interaction, spending time the people on their farms and in the clinics. “These students are led to value and celebrate their ruralness and praised for their intention to go into rural medicine,” Wheat said…UA’s Rural Health Leaders Pipeline programs address these issues with three primary components – the Rural Health Scholars Program, the Rural Minority Health Scholars Program and the Rural Medical Scholars Program. The programs are funded by the state Legislature through the Alabama Family Practice Rural Health Board, as well as with grants and donations.

EDITORIAL: We applaud Mal Moore for deserving honor
Tuscaloosa News – Dec. 9
On Tuesday, University of Alabama Athletic Director Mal Moore was recognized for outstanding achievements in his profession with the John L. Toner Award at the National Football Foundation Awards in New York. It’s a fitting honor for an outstanding administrator, coach and human being…Mal Moore has earned the respect of his profession and his community. The recognition he received was well-deserved.

Terry, Nick Saban dedicate Nick’s Kids Playground
Tuscaloosa News – Dec. 10
A couple of years ago, Terry Saban was walking along the Riverwalk on the Black Warrior River, stopped, turned to a friend, and said “This would be a great spot for a playground.” On Friday, the wife of University of Alabama football coach Nick Saban sheared a red ribbon making the playground a reality. And with that, the Nick’s Kids Playground opened for Tuscaloosa children as the latest development along the river bank beside Jack Warner Parkway. The Nick’s Kids Fund, the Sabans’ charity organization benefiting children, partnered with Alabama Forever, the city of Tuscaloosa, Almon Associates, Hammill Recreation, the Junior League of Tuscaloosa and Mike Chambers to build the playground. Even before the ribbon was cut, the playground was covered with laughing children.
NBC 13 (Birmingham) – Dec. 9

Luminarias light up Quad for a cause Sunday night
Tuscaloosa News – Dec. 10
The candlelight glowed softly in the early evening hours on Sunday, giving an almost ethereal look to the Quad on the University of Alabama campus. Hundreds of white paper bags lined the sidewalks between Denny Chimes and the Amelia Gayle Gorgas Library, and along University Boulevard, keeping alive a tradition that began more than 40 years ago. Luminarias on the Quad, which is sponsored by the university’s Circle K student organization, not only brings a bit of holiday cheer to students and the community but raises awareness for one of the club’s main projects, Jean Dean Reading is Fundamental.  All proceeds raised will go toward getting books into the hands of children in Alabama, said Circle K club president Forrest Ford.  “That’s what is so great about this organization,” he said. “You’re helping children in Alabama.”

Tuscaloosa Symphony Orchestra’s ‘Christmas Around the World,’ silent auction tonight in Moody
Al.com – Dec. 10
The Tuscaloosa Symphony Orchestra will perform their holiday-themed concert tonight at 7 p.m. in the Moody Music Building Concert Hall on the University of Alabama campus. The “Christmas Around the World” concert will feature lots of Christmas favorites to get your toes tapping and you singing along with special guest the Alabama Choir School, directed by Jeff Procter. This is the Alabama Choir School’s second year joining the TSO. The concert will be conducted by musical director Adam Flatt who is in his second season directing for the TSO.  “The concert is a lot of familiar holiday music, ‘Deck the Halls,’ a selection from ‘The Nutcracker,’ there’s a singalong, so it’s all very successful music,” said TSO Executive Director Elizabeth McGuire. “It’s really a lovely concert. The Choir School kids have a special feature too that’s a lot of fun and involves the saxophone soloist and I think everyone will really enjoy that.”

EDITORIAL: JIMMY SMOTHERS: They ‘Fought the War’
Gadsden Times – Dec. 10
A news release mentioned that Ed and Alice Carrell of Gadsden are among more than 112 former University of Alabama students featured in a recently published book about World War II. “Interested in writing something on this couple?” Times Executive Editor Ron Reaves asked. Sure. I jump at just about any opportunity to write about someone who fought in that war. I immediately contacted author Delbert Reed for a review copy of his book, “All of Us Fought the War.” I was told that Ed had served in the Navy and his wife was in the WAVES, that both were really nice people and well known in the Gadsden area.  The 380-page coffee table book has many other names and stories that will be familiar to Gadsden residents. Some have ties to this city, such as Herb Chapman, who once coached at Emma Sansom High School. He played baseball and football at Alabama, then served in the 82nd Airborne Division glider group, taking part in some of the biggest battles of the war.
WVUA (Tuscaloosa) – Dec. 9

Nearly 5,000 Alabama college students lost Pell grants due to new federal regulations, study says
Al.com – Dec. 7
Nearly 5,000 Alabama college students lost Pell grant funding in the fall of 2012 due to new restrictions on the federal student-assistance program, a study says. The study, conducted by the Education Policy Center at the University of Alabama and commissioned by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, shows 4,731 students lost their grants due to a new lifetime-eligibility restriction approved by Congress in June. “Many of these students registered for classes in the spring 2012 term and at the same time applied for Pell, and instead of receiving notice that the federal aid would be there, received bills for tuition and fees,” the study says. Another 12,057 students are within two semesters of losing Pell eligibility due to the restriction, which limits students to 12 full-time semesters of aid in their lifetime, according to the study.

The University of Alabama, a student-centered research university, is experiencing significant growth in both enrollment and academic quality. This growth, which is positively impacting the campus and the state's economy, is in keeping with UA's vision to be the university of choice for the best and brightest students. UA, the state's flagship university, is an academic community united in its commitment to enhancing the quality of life for all Alabamians.