The University of Alabama

UA in the News: October 5, 2012

Grant funds UA research projects
Tuscaloosa News – Oct. 5
Four University of Alabama research projects were among 15 such projects at state universities that have received a total of $4 million in grants from the Alabama Innovation Fund. Gov. Robert Bentley announced the grants Wednesday at the state’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Conference in Hoover, saying the ongoing research and innovation will help create jobs across the state…The Alabama Innovation Fund supports research and economic development initiatives from the state’s public colleges and universities. The fund is a part of Accelerate Alabama — the state’s long-term plan for economic development. “By awarding these grants, we are investing in new opportunities that will benefit our communities for years to come,” Bentley said. “The Alabama Innovation Fund supports high-tech research and innovative ideas. These grants will lead to new innovations for our communities and more jobs for Alabamians.”
WPMI-NBC (Mobile) – Oct. 4

Time flies when you’re pursuing the right goal
Psychology Today – Aug. 4
When we are engaged in the pursuit of something important and meaningful…time really does seem to pass more quickly. This perception, say psychological scientists Philip Gable and Bryan Pool, of the University of Alabama, who investigated the phenomena, may help us persevere to achieve greater goals. And, help us hone our focus long enough to satisfy our basic survival needs for things like food, water, companionship.

American Indian Culture to be honored at Moundville Native American Festival in Alabama
Indian Country Today – Oct. 4
From a small circle of people selling handicrafts, Alabama’s Moundville Native American Festival, October 10 to 13, has grown to be among the top tourism events in the state and a big celebration of the Southeast Indian heritage and culture. Now on its 24th year, the festival—conceived as part of Jones Archaeological Museum’s 50th year anniversary celebration—boasts of award-winning and accomplished musicians, dancers, storytellers, artists and educators. “Over the last 24 years, we’ve helped educate over 100,000 people about the arts, crafts and lifeways of Southeastern Indian,” said Betsy Irwin, festival director. “Many of the Native Americans attending the festival consider this a homecoming and they look forward to sharing their culture and experience with visitors.” Irwin said the festival averages 12,000 visitors from Wednesday to Saturday. About 8,000 are schoolchildren from Alabama and Mississippi. The event is held on the grounds of the 300-acre Moundville Archaeological Park, a historic Native American site and also home to the newly renovated Jones Museum. Two years after the festival was launched, in 1989, dancers were welcomed to the circle. The move helped define what the festival is all about. “One of the things we are doing is involving The University of Alabama,” said Irwin. Heather Kopelson, assistant professor of the university will be at the festival to answer questions and open people’s eyes about stereotyping Native Americans. The University of Alabama, through its Museum Systems, runs the festival.

UA announces homecoming schedule, ‘Timeless Traditions’ theme
Al.com – Oct. 4
The University of Alabama is prepping for homecoming week, which takes place Oct. 21-27, and recently announced the theme is “Timeless Traditions.” Of course, the week will culminate when the Crimson Tide football team plays Mississippi State on Saturday, Oct. 27 in Bryant-Denny Stadium, but there’s plenty to do leading up to the game. The week will begin with the 24th Annual Roll Tide Run on Sunday, Oct. 21. Registration and check-in will be at the rear of Gorgas Library at noon, and the race will begin on Capstone Drive on the UA campus at 1 p.m. “Paint the Town Red” will begin on Monday, Oct. 22, from 1-4 p.m., when students will show their UA school spirit across Tuscaloosa by painting UA-themed murals in business windows along University Boulevard. Students can pick up materials at the Ferguson Center SGA Office. The Bowling Tournament is also scheduled for Monday at 9 p.m. at Bama Bowl. Homecoming queen elections will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 23, from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. Students can vote online and find more information at www.mybama.ua.edu. The Basketball Tournament is scheduled for Tuesday, starting at 7 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center. CanFormation and judging will be from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Presidential Village. On Wednesday, Oct. 24, students can participate in a dodgeball competition, starting at 7p.m. at the Student Recreation Center. The Choreography Contest will be held Thursday, Oct. 25, at 7 p.m. in Foster Auditorium.

Beat Auburn Beat Hunger food drive set for Oct. 8 start at UA
Al.com – Oct. 4
The University of Alabama Community Service Center kick off the 19th Annual Beat Auburn Beat Hunger food drive Monday, Oct. 8, from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. in the Ferguson Plaza, Reese Phifer and Lloyd Halls. The event includes music and free food as well as the opportunity to vote in a pie throwing contest. Students, faculty and staff can choose a contestant and make a donation in a jar in their honor. An additional fundraiser will take place at TCBY from 6-9 p.m. as part of the event. Contestants include UA Honors College Dean Shane Sharpe, Alabama football punter Cody Mandell, famed UA student fan Jack “The Face” Blankenship and other campus leaders. The contestant with the most donations in his or her jar will return to the Ferguson Plaza at noon on Wednesday to be the recipient of a pie gently tossed to the face by the highest donor at Monday’s event. Who doesn’t want to see Blankenship’s famous face catch a flying pie? “Beat Auburn Beat Hunger is a great way for the University of Alabama and the Tuscaloosa community to unite under a good cause,” said Andres Mendieta, student director for the food drive, according to a UA release. “Last year, we raised close to 237,000 pounds of food for the West Alabama Food Bank,and this year we are expecting to raise even more. No matter what the end results are, both sides will work hard to help the needy in our communities.”

Calhoun County home foreclosures on downward trend
Anniston Star – Oct. 5
Leonard Zumpano, professor of finance at the University of Alabama and the chair of real estate economics for the Alabama Association of Realtors, said many parts of the state and country are experiencing fewer foreclosures. “The housing market in general is getting better,” Zumpano said. “Prices are going up … banks have been more willing to renegotiate loans.”

Sen. Jerry Fielding formally announces change of party
Anniston Star – Oct. 4
State Sen. Jerry Fielding made it official Thursday: He’s a Republican. After days of speculation and a spoiler announcement by the Alabama Democratic Party, the senator from Sylacauga announced in a Statehouse press conference that he was joining the GOP…“I couldn’t sit by and watch the Democrat Party adopt such an extremely liberal agenda,” Fielding said in the release. That’s almost exactly what University of Alabama political science professor William Stewart predicted Fielding would say, in an interview the night before the press conference. “If I were his adviser, I’d tell him to say he watched the convention and felt the Democrats had become too extreme,” Stewart said.

2012 EMCC Homecoming
Meridian Star – Oct. 5
One studies history, the other makes history, and East Mississippi Community College will honor both at Homecoming 2012. Eugene Futato of Macon and Mary Margaret “Miss M.” Smith of Louisville are EMCC’s 2012 Alumnus of the Year and Distinguished Service Award winners. Both will be honored Oct. 6 during EMCC’s Alumni Luncheon…Futato, who now makes his home in Moundville, Ala., is deputy director of the Office of Archaeological Research and curator of archaeological collections for University of Alabama Museums. His resume includes a long list of titles in the fields of archaeology and anthropology at the University of Alabama. He is a member of 12 professional societies, has authored or co-authored nearly 80 scholarly publications, and has received well over $5 million in research funding and a number of prestigious honors. Most recently he received the 2012 E. Roger Sayers Distinguished Service Award from UA, the highest faculty/staff award given by the university.

The University of Alabama, a student-centered research university, is experiencing significant growth in both enrollment and academic quality. This growth, which is positively impacting the campus and the state's economy, is in keeping with UA's vision to be the university of choice for the best and brightest students. UA, the state's flagship university, is an academic community united in its commitment to enhancing the quality of life for all Alabamians.