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The University of Alabama

Native American Festival at UA’s Moundville Park Named One of Top 10 Events for Alabama History in 2009

Jimmie Sanders, dressed similarly to Seminoles and Creeks from the late 18th century, displays a powder horn to visitors at the 2005 Moundville Native American Festival. (Photo by UA Office of Photography)

Jimmie Sanders, dressed similarly to Seminoles and Creeks from the late 18th century, displays a powder horn to visitors at the 2005 Moundville Native American Festival. (Photo by UA Office of Photography)

MOUNDVILLE, Ala. – Historical festivals and celebrations are the focus of the 2009 Top 10 Events released by the Alabama Tourism Department. October’s Moundville Native American Festival, staged at The University of Alabama Museums’ Moundville Archaeological Park, makes the list this year along with other venerable festivals around the state.

Gov. Bob Riley and the tourism department kicked off the Year of Alabama History on Dec. 12 at the state Department of Archives and History in Montgomery to coincide with the 189th birthday celebration of Alabama’s statehood.

“These 10 events not only celebrate Alabama’s history, but also the history of our nation,” says Lee Sentell, Alabama tourism director. “When we select the top 10 events for the year, we focus on those things unique to our state and that would be of interest to national and international media.”

The Moundville Native American Festival will be Wednesday, Oct. 7— Saturday, Oct. 10, 2009. See how Southeastern Indians lived in Moundville with some 26 earthen mounds serving as a backdrop. Festival features include a living history encampment, demonstration arbors, a children’s area and arts activities. Admission charged. For details, phone 205/371-2234, or go to www.moundville.ua.edu. Alabama’s 2009 Calendar of Events is available online at www.alabama.travel.

The park is open daily 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Group discounts are available. A variety of programs for children and adults are offered teaching Native American culture, arts and technologies. UA’s Moundville Archaeological Park is 14 miles south of The University of Alabama campus at 1 Mound State Parkway in Moundville, south of Interstate 20/59 and off Alabama state Highway 69.

Children learn how to prepare corn at a recent Moundville Native American Festival.

Children learn how to prepare corn at a recent Moundville Native American Festival.

The other nine festivals on the list are:

Feb. 7, Huntsville: “Year of Apollo” Kickoff Gala (www.spacecamp.com).

Feb. 24, Mobile: Mardi Gras in Mobile (www.mobile.org).

March 5-8, Selma: Bridge Crossing Jubilee (www.thebridgecrossingjubilee.org).

March 20-22, Bridgeport: “Siege of Bridgeport” Re-enactment (www.jacksoncountychamber.com).

April 3-5, Eufaula: Eufaula Pilgrimage (www.eufaulapilgrimage.com).

April 18-19, Cullman: Bloomin’ Festival Arts and Crafts Fair (www.bloominfestival.com)

Aug. 1 & 2, Dauphin Island & Gulf Shores: “Battle of Mobile Bay” Weekend (www.dauphinisland.org).

Oct. 2-3, Athens: Tennessee Valley Old Time Fiddlers Convention (www.athens.edu/fiddlers).

Nov. 4-7, Wetumpka: Alabama Frontier Days.

The University of Alabama, a student-centered research university, is experiencing significant growth in both enrollment and academic quality. This growth, which is positively impacting the campus and the state's economy, is in keeping with UA's vision to be the university of choice for the best and brightest students. UA, the state's flagship university, is an academic community united in its commitment to enhancing the quality of life for all Alabamians.